SHLA Fall Meeting

Invitation: SHLA Fall Annual Meeting 2017

The SHLA Fall Annual Meeting will be held Friday, November 2 at 9:30 AM in the Alexandria Room at the Dr. John Archer Library, University of Regina.

Brief Schedule

10:00 AM – Welcome/Introductions

10:15 AM – Roundtable Updates

10:30 AM – SHLA Fall Annual Meeting

11:30 AM – Lunch

1:00 PM – CE Session: Google for Good Evidence (Webinar)
Presented by Orvie Dingwall and Maureen Babb (Neil John Maclean Health Sciences Library, University of Manitoba)

2:00 PM – Wrap Up

The full agenda has been distributed to members via email. Please contact the SHLA executive if you have not received a copy.

Journal Club: Developing a Generic Tool to Routinely Measure the Impact of Health Libraries

Meeting date: Tuesday, September 18, 2018

Presenter: Catherine Young

Citation: Ayre, S., Brettle, A., Gilroy, D., Knock, D., Mitchelmore, R.,… Turner, J. (2018). Developing a generic tool to routinely measure the impact of health libraries. Health Information and Libraries Journal, 35(3), 227-245. doi: https://doi.org/10.1111/hir.12223

Article abstract:

Background
Health libraries contribute to many activities of a health care organisation. Impact assessment needs to capture that range of contributions.

Objectives
To develop and pilot a generic impact questionnaire that: (1) could be used routinely across all English NHS libraries; (2) built on previous impact surveys; and (3) was reliable and robust.

Methods
This collaborative project involved: (1) literature search; (2) analysis of current best practice and baseline survey of use of current tools and requirements; (3) drafting and piloting the questionnaire; and (4) analysis of the results, revision and plans for roll out.

Findings
The framework selected was the International Standard Methods And Procedures For Assessing The Impact Of Libraries (ISO 16439). The baseline survey (n = 136 library managers) showed that existing tools were not used, and impact assessment was variable. The generic questionnaire developed used a Critical Incident Technique. Analysis of the findings (n = 214 health staff and students), plus comparisons with previous impact studies indicated that the questionnaire should capture the impact for all types of health libraries.

Conclusions
The collaborative project successfully piloted a generic impact questionnaire that, subject to further validation, should apply to many types of health library and information services.

Critical Appraisal: 

Critical Appraisal Worksheet

Completed Critical Appraisal Summary

Journal Club: Use of Annual Surveying to Identify Technology Trends and Improve Service Provision

Meeting date: Tuesday, July 24, 2018

Presenter: Michelle Dalidowicz

Citation: Norton, Hannah F., (2018). Use of Annual Surveying to Identify Technology Trends and Improve Service Provision . Journal of the Medical Library Association. 106 (3), p . 320-329. DOI: https://doi.org/10.5195/jmla.2018.324

Article abstract:
Objective: At an academic health sciences library serving a wide variety of disciplines, studying library users’ technology use provides necessary information on intersection points for library services. Administering a similar survey annually for five years generated a holistic view of users’ technology needs and preferences over time.

Methods: From 2012 to 2016, the University of Florida Health Science Center Library (HSCL) annually administered a sixteen-to-twenty question survey addressing health sciences users’ technology awareness and use and their interest in using technology to engage with the library and its services. The survey was distributed throughout the HSC via email invitation from liaison librarians to their colleges and departments and advertisement on the HSCL home page.

Results: Smartphone ownership among survey respondents was nearly universal, and a majority of respondents also owned a tablet. While respondents were likely to check library hours, use medical apps, and use library electronic resources from their mobile devices, they were unlikely to friend or follow the library on Facebook or Twitter or send a call number from the catalog. Respondents were more likely to have used EndNote than any other citation management tool, but over 50% of respondents had never used each tool or never heard of it.

Conclusions: Annual review of survey results has allowed librarians to identify users’ needs and interests, leading to incremental changes in services offered. Reviewing the aggregate data allowed strategic consideration of how technology impacts library interactions with users, with implications toward library marketing, training, and service development.

Critical Appraisal: 

Critical Appraisal Worksheet

Critical Appraisal Questions:

  1. How could these results inform your technology acquisition, policy and/or training?
  2. Was there anything that was particularly surprising to you about the results?
  3. Do you sense that the technology gaps from this study could be the same at your institution? Is there anything else that might be missing [e.g. Training topics]?

Completed Critical Appraisal Summary

Chapter Update: 2018 Spring AGM

The 2018 Spring SHLA meeting opened with two member presentations and roundtable updates from members.

Susan Baer, Director of Libraries and Archives at Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region, presented on the history and research developments of a working group of pan-Canadian librarians investigating the development of standards for literature searching. The group used an online questionnaire to identify steps searchers would take to conduct an ‘exemplary search,’ and developed a living-document glossary to address the issue of inconsistencies in search term use. Over time, the project developed from a standard into a code of practice to inform mediated searching practices.

Saskatchewan Polytechnic librarians Tasha Maddison and Diane Zerr discussed a new online module created for the institute’s Adult Teaching and Learning Program. This program develops and advances the leadership and instructional skills of faculty. The Library has previously provided in-person research, citation, and technology education sessions to support learners. The shift to online, self-paced instruction has provided the Library with the opportunity to collaborate with Learning Technology trainers and Adult Teaching and Learning instructors. Diane and Tasha showcased the librarian’s role in blended curriculum design by integrating learning outcomes, learning steps, and assessments into the modules.

Roundtable updates were given on member activities at the Saskatchewan Health Authority, Saskatchewan Polytechnic, University of Regina, and University of Saskatchewan (see minutes for details).

To kick off the AGM, Lance provided an update on the SHLA Journal Club, which currently has 14 members and is now listed on the Library Journal Club Network. Gina demonstrated options for uniting content from the JC and SHLA WordPress sites. The motion to combine the Journal Club website content with the SHLA website, and to make this content public, was passed.

Updates from the executive members included an overview of executive activities over the year, which focused on administrative and business continuity. The Constitutional Review Working Group Report was discussed, and accepted with amendments. No nominees were volunteered for Secretary-Treasurer and President-Elect. Alongside another call for these vacant positions, nominations for the new Continuing Education Coordinator position will be sent out to the membership.

Motions to spent surplus SHLA funds by supporting the current President in her attendance of the 2018 CHLA/ABSC Conference, and to create bursaries to send the 2019 Executive to the CHLA/ABSC conference (based on operating budget), were carried. A motion to establish an operating budget was also put forward and carried.

Michelle requested that the membership review the CHLA/ABSC Strategic Plan to provide ideas and suggestions to inform future directions of the SHLA.

Journal Club: Research engagement of health sciences librarians

Meeting date: Tuesday, May 29, 2018

Presenter: Catherine Hana

Citation: Dawson, D. (DeDe) ., (2018). Effective Practices and Strategies for Open Access Outreach: A Qualitative Study. Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication. 6(1), p.eP2216. DOI: http://doi.org/10.7710/2162-3309.2216

Article abstract:
INTRODUCTION – There are many compelling reasons to make research open access (OA), but raising the awareness of faculty and administrators about OA is a struggle. Now that more and more funders are introducing OA policies, it is increasingly important that researchers understand OA and how to comply with these policies. U.K. researchers and their institutions have operated within a complex OA policy environment for many years, and academic libraries have been at the forefront of providing services and outreach to support them. This article discusses the results of a qualitative study that investigated effective practices and strategies of OA outreach in the United Kingdom.

METHODS – Semistructured interviews were conducted with 14 individuals at seven universities in the United Kingdom in late 2015. Transcripts of these interviews were analyzed for dominant themes using an inductive method of coding.

RESULTS – Themes were collected under the major headings of “The Message”; “Key Contacts and Relationships”; “Qualities of the OA Practitioner”; and “Advocacy versus Compliance.” DISCUSSION Results indicate that messages about OA need to be clear, concise, and jargon free. They need to be delivered repeatedly and creatively adapted to specific audiences. Identifying and building relationships with influencers and informers is key to the uptake of the message, and OA practitioners must have deep expertise to be credible as the messengers.

CONCLUSION – This timely research has immediate relevance to North American libraries as they contend with pressures to ramp up their own OA outreach and support services to assist researchers in complying with new federal funding policies.

Reason for selection: DeDe presented at the joint SHLA/MAHIP CE session on May 10. As several journal club members also attended the session, I thought it would be good to take a more in-depth look at DeDe’s findings. For those who were not at the CE session, this is still an interesting and relevant topic that has not been well covered in previous journal club meetings.

Critical Appraisal:
Completed Critical Appraisal Worksheet

Chapter Update: Spring AGM, 2018

Invitation: SHLA Spring 2018 AGM

The SHLA Spring AGM will be held on Friday, June 1, 2018 in Room 1430 of the Lesley and Irene Dubé Health Sciences Library at the University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon.  An agenda and all other information will follow.

Call for Presenters
We will have time for two member presentations of approximately 10-20 minutes each.  If you would like to discuss a recent project/publication or would like a chance to practice your presentation before conference season, we encourage you to consider presenting at the AGM. Please contact Caroline at before Friday, April 20, if you’re interested.

Journal Club: New directions in health sciences libraries in Canada

Meeting date: March 28, 2018

Presenter: Gina Brander

Citation: Ganshorn, H., & Giustini, D. (2017). New directions in health sciences libraries in Canada: Research and evidence based practice are key. Health Information & Libraries Journal, 34(3), 252–257. https://doi.org/10.1111/hir.12190

Article abstract: This article is the second in a new series in this regular feature. The intention of the series is to look at important global developments in health science libraries. These articles will serve as a road map, describing the key changes in the field and exploring factors driving these changes. The present article by two Canadian librarians identifies important national developments which are shaping the profession such as the centralisation of health care services, the challenge of providing consumer health information in the absence of a national strategy, government recognition of the need to recognise and respond to the health needs of indigenous peoples and the growing emphasis on managing research data. Although their profession is strong, health science librarians must find ways of providing enhanced services with fewer staff and demonstrate value to organisations.

Reason for selection: 
As a librarian currently working in post-secondary education, I found this bird’s-eye view of trends in health sciences libraries and librarianship informative and thought-provoking. In fact, as soon as I finished reading the article, I had several questions I wanted to fire at colleagues working in hospitals and health research contexts! I therefore selected this article because I am interested in learning about the on-the-ground experiences of health librarians in Saskatchewan, and whether the same factors driving these changes elsewhere in Canadian health libraries are at work in our province. As well, I hope to learn more about some of the challenges resulting from budget cuts and organizational restructuring.

Critical appraisal questions & summary: 

  1. Have any of the five trends identified by Ganshorn and Giustini resulted in added or changed roles in your library? Which trend has most significantly impacted your daily practice?
  • There is definitely more of a role for librarians to introduce and facilitate the use of different technologies. Our users want more online and open access books and journals as well as mobile apps which are in high demand compared to a few years ago. Academic settings are seeing a large increase in 3D printing and even wanting to borrow iPads and laptops, interestingly not all students appear to have their own.
  • Centralisation of health services is obviously very relevant to the day-to-day experience for the new Saskatchewan Health Authority. Different libraries (and ways of providing services) have had to come together and provide a new single service that is being pushed out to the whole province. This has a major impact on collection development.
  1. One trend observed by the authors is the centralisation of provincial health care services. In the face of the recent dissolution of the twelve health regions in favour of one provincial health authority in Saskatchewan, do you agree that the overall result of centralisation has been, or will be, improved access to collections and library services?
  • SHIRP licensed products have helped with the new centralisation of health services. Regina had a larger budget than Saskatoon and Prince Albert so it has improved access to resources for everyone. The former health region libraries were already working together in some ways even before the amalgamation happened and relationships were already developed which has helped facilitate this transition.
  • The Saskatchewan Health Authority Library is ready to go but still waiting for other things to happen in the Health Authority so that we have a clearer direction (ex. strategic plan, marketing, etc).
  • Webinars and training sessions via WebEx being offered to staff from some of the former health regions that ha dno library. However this comes with its challenges such as only having 1 WebEx account.
  1. Another trend observed was a movement towards supporting diverse populations/health consumers, with an emphasis on providing culturally competent and inclusive consumer health information to Indigenous communities. Can you speak about any steps your library has taken to respond to the TRC’s seven health-specific Calls to Action, such as the selection and inclusion of Indigenous-focused content and resources?
  • The importance of incorporating Indigenous ways of knowing and learning has  been emphasized in academic settings. Looking at different approaches and awareness of history and issues related to Indigenous Peoples, making sure  resources are not just selected, but also featured and promoted to staff to help develop cultural competency.
  •  There has been some connecting with Elders, weekly staff huddles where one of the calls to action is read out loud and everyone talks about what is being done. It should be noted however that there tends to not be enough follow-up. But the huddles are great for making staff aware and keeping them informed of what is being done.
  • The 1st year nursing students have to do an indigenous project so connecting them with information (Canadian, Saskatchewan, UofS iPortal) and addressing their needs. UofR works closely in partnership with the First Nations University and partners with things like books.
  • Also indigenizing the library spaces and making sure they are inclusive. UofR has beautiful indigenous art in the building. UofS campus has also done a great job.
  • There is a difference in clinical settings perhaps because clinical librarians depend on the needs of their users and these types of questions aren’t being asked as much.
  • The Regina General Hospital has an Indigenous Healing Centre at its front entrance. Perhaps an opportunity here for the library to do something?
  1. Have you witnessed an increased demand for support around systematic reviews and other forms of evidence synthesis? If so, how has your library met the increase in demand? Have new service models been explored or piloted at your library? Have any library roles shifted towards increased embeddedness to support the needs of research teams?
  • Increase in requests for systematic reviews in Kinesiology and Nursing in academic settings. Very time consuming, mostly consists of doing the literature review and extracting the data.
  • Telling them the librarian must be included as an author
  • The people requesting these reviews usually haven’t done enough preparation before approaching the library and they get turned away.
  • Sometimes when asked to re-run a search, the strategies are not good and include very few search terms so it becomes more time consuming.
  1. How do health sciences libraries continue to meet the challenging demands for increased services in the face of budgetary cuts? Are we simply facing the same issues as those who came before us, or do you see the need for a serious overhaul in terms of how we provide information resources and services to users?
  • “We’re always doing more with less.”
  • One strategy mentioned in the article is to utilize and teach the technology. Use video conference software to reach as many people as possible (also using something like RedCap).
  • Enable our users to do as much of the work on their own as possible.
  • York University has a tool to help with modules, research, and writing that the UofR has been looking at.
  1. Are there any developments shaping our profession that Ganshorn and Guistini did not mention, which you feel warrant attention?
  • These authors did a great job selecting the major issues in Canada, but they only touched briefly on the struggle of demonstrating our value.
  • There isn’t much benchmarking on staff ratio for our libraries.
  • There was no mention of the dissolution of the CLA and creation of CFLA.

Journal Club: Where and how early career researchers find scholarly information

Meeting date: January 23, 2018

Presenter: Suzy Bear

Citation: Nicholas, D., Boukacem-Zeghmouri, C., Rodriguez-Bravo, B., Xu, J., Watkinson, A., Abrizah, A., Herman, E., & Swigon, M. (2017). Where and how early career researchers find scholarly information. Learned Publishing, 30(1) doi:10.1002/leap.1087. http://ciber-research.eu/download/20170103-Where_and_How_ECRs_Find_Scholarly_Information-LEAP1087.pdf

Article abstract: This article presents findings from the first year of the Harbingers research project started in 2015. The project is a 3-year longitudinal study of early career researchers (ECRs) to ascertain their current and changing habits with regard to information searching, use, sharing, and publication. The study recruited 116 researchers from seven countries (UK, USA, China, France, Malaysia, Poland, and Spain) and performed in-depth interviews by telephone, Skype, or face-to-face to discover behaviours and opinions. This paper reports on findings regarding discovery and access to scholarly information.
Findings confirm the universal popularity of Google/Google Scholar. Library platforms and web-scale discovery services are largely unmentioned and unnoticed by this user community, although many ECRs pass through them unknowingly on the way to authenticated use of their other preferred sources, such as Web of Science. ECRs are conscious of the benefits of open access in delivering free access to papers. Social media are widely used as a source of discovering scholarly information. ResearchGate is popular and on the rise in all countries surveyed. Smartphones have become a regularly used platform on which to perform quick and occasional searches for scholarly information but are only rarely used for reading full text.

Discussion summary & recommendations:
This study examines how early career researchers (ECRs) find scholarly information. The “who” is answered but not the “why”. A clear problem of how they find information definitely exists and is addressed. There didn’t seem to be any real method for recruitment in this study, it was quite random with no mention of why specific countries were selected (Canada was also excluded). Some of the interviews done in other languages were transcribed and then later translated. The study was done over a 3 year period which is a long time (a lot can change over 3 years). Looks like they are reporting the initial results but still have another 2 years to go. The relationship between the researchers and participants is not discussed. The final results demonstrate a lack of effective marketing by libraries. Many of the participants had no idea they were accessing their materials via the library (ex. the PDF’s they find in Google Scholar are thanks to the library’s IP address). There is definitely a big understanding of what libraries actually do. Marketing an be hard because many can’t be bothered to even read what we put out. There is a big problem with administration staff who clearly don’t understand what the library is all about and they make statements about how everything is online and the library is not needed or just a bunch of books. We can market more to them but should also focus on ECRs since they can be the ones to change the trend. We can’t compete with Google and shouldn’t try to. Discovery layers not functioning well for users sometimes doesn’t help either. These results are mentioned for academic libraries but apply to all library settings too.