Journal Club – A New Tool for Collection Assessment: One Library’s Response to the Calls to Action Issued by Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission

Meeting Date: March 22, 2021

Presenter: Vanja Stojanovic

Article: Linton J, Ducas A. A New Tool for Collection Assessment: One Library’s Response to the Calls to Action Issued by Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Collection Management [Internet]. 2017 [cited 2021 Mar 9];42(3–4):256–79. Available from: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01462679.2017.1344596

Questions:

1) What is one thing that stood out to you about this article? What did you learn?

  • The University of Manitoba medical school was the first school to integrate an Indigenous library collection into their curriculum.
    • Created in 2016, surprising it took until then
  • It is important to partner with the Indigenous communities from the very beginning when engaging in collection development or offering resources and services
  • Balancing out a collection, a bit of an awakening of thinking about health resources being beyond just health science-based,

2) Tell us a little bit about some of the Indigenous health resources that your library collects and provides.

  • The SHA library in Prince Albert has put together some resources for their consumer health collection, include autobiographies of First Nations peoples.
  • Small collection at St. Paul’s in Saskatoon, put  together a bit of a guide in 2019, mostly consumer health than literature for SHA staff
  • The SHA library website has an Indigenous guide with books, website, links, and other policies available to browse.
  • The iPortal (Indigenous Studies Portal Research Tool) can also be searched for resources (available from the University of Saskatchewan library).
  • UofR has many of titles mentioned in the article, sections on indigenous health in both French and English sections of the nursing lib guide

3) How can we as health librarians listen to and collaborate with Indigenous communities, Indigenous healthcare professionals, and/or organizational departments dedicated to Indigenous patients and their families to “balance” our collections?

  • We need to acknowledge that books and materials aren’t the whole picture, the oral history and non-tangible material needs to be included
  • Alternative formats like videos are one way to offer resources relevant to Indigenous communities.
  • As librarians, we should make every effort not think about our work as an extraction and packaging of Indigenous knowledge. True collaboration with Indigenous peoples is the first step.
  • The SHA Indigenous Resources guide was developed in collaboration with the SHA Indigenous and Metis department
  • Need to make time for collaboration
    • People and effort are often constrained and this isn’t a priority in our work overall even if it should be
  • Need to think about it collaboratively, need to stay and build, not a one-time information extraction
  • Programs try to collaborate, but often just trying to ‘show’ work rather than continuing to make the changes permanent to make a permanent forward motion than a one off

4) What are some ways we can integrate Indigenous health resources into our own library services on a regular basis?

  • In reference interviews, we can ask users if they are interested in finding Indigenous resources as part of their search.
  • We can use established search hedges when conducting literature searches; some existing hedges can be adapted to meet the specific needs of the communities served.
  • The article highlights the importance of doing the work long term, creating a solid foundation and building relationships as the most effective way to integrate Indigenous health resources.
  • Centering Indigenous peoples and resources relevant to them is one strategy that we can adopt immediately in all of our work as librarians.
  • One way to center Indigenous peoples is to include Indigenous resources in all contexts, whether it is a guide for cancer patients, consumer health pamphlets, or another context in which Indigenous people have not typically been included
  • Make sure that the patrons know that the resources that are from other jurisdictions aren’t going to be a one-to-one fit just because they’re also about indigenous persons

5) An Indigenous worldview acknowledges many determinants of health beyond biomedical and social frameworks, such as “spirituality, relationship to the land, geography, culture, language, and knowledge systems” (p.259).

5a) What role do we play in advocating for the support and use of a collection that is more interdisciplinary and includes a variety of sources (e.g., grey literature, videos, pamphlets, etc.) that are relevant to Indigenous communities?

  • We [librarians] definitely play a role – the “one health” approach as a possible framework for working with Indigenous ways of knowing and health beliefs

5b) How might we diversify our collections in situations where financial resources are scarce?

  • We could allocate grant money to purchase resources;
  • We could seek our and create opportunities for collaboration and cost-sharing for resource;
  • Resource sharing as another way forward (e.g., ILL);
  • We need to understand our institutional priorities and advocate for resources that support Indigenous communities and our users.

6) What is your biggest takeaway after discussing this article that you can applying to your own practice?

  • Using the TRC guidelines to evaluate our own collection is a good first step.
  • Community engagement and relationship building is essential.
  • Centering Indigenous resources everywhere we can is something we can all do in our daily work

Helpful Links:

Journal Club – Computerized versus hand-scored health literacy tools: a comparison of Simple Measure of Gobbledygook (SMOG) and Flesch-Kincaid in printed patient education materials

Meeting Date: January 27, 2021

Presenter: Brianna Howell-Spooner

Article: Grabeel KL, Russomanno J, Oelschlegel S, Tester E, Heidel RE. Computerized versus hand-scored health literacy tools: a comparison of Simple Measure of Gobbledygook (SMOG) and Flesch-Kincaid in printed patient education materials. J Med Libr Assoc. 2018 Jan;106(1):38-45. doi: 10.5195/jmla.2018.262. Epub 2018 Jan 2. PMID: 29339932; PMCID: PMC5764592.

Questions:

1) Had anyone heard of the Simple Measure of Gobbledygook and Flesch-Kincaid measurements before? What do you know about them?

  • Never heard of them.
  • Yes, SMOG
  • Yes, Flesch-Kincaid

2) Are these measurements comparable? Is either a good choice for comparison of consumer health materials?

  • Not comparable
  • Hand scoring is more manipulable,
  • “Hand-scoring patient education materials allows evaluators to work directly with the text, alerting them to multisyllabic words and long sentences”
  • Flesch-Kincaid could be done by hand but it would be too much work
  • Electronic is more feasible because it’s built into the word processors, but the hand-scored one is more accurate if done correctly
  • The graphic layout can throw off the mathematics
  • Period and decimal would be read the same, electronic -1 CHI

3) Are these reading level measurements sensitive enough for health/medical materials?  

  • SMOG seems like a blunt instrument, based on =>3-syllable words, certain medical condition’s names are much longer
    • Greater chance for a higher grade level
  • What was Flesch-Kincaid first developed for? Was it for literacy grading in actuality or just a theoretical model? This will affect its measurement capabilities

4) Is it worth the extra time to run a hand scoring literacy measure?

  • Context, if a practitioner is meeting with someone they know has the literacy level, no problems
  • Practitioners need to be aware, levels stated could be wrong or could be area dependent (university reading level, but in Law)
  • The materials which a patient can pick up independently of communication with a medical practitioner are where you want to see the proper scoring for literacy levels
    • No chance for the practitioner to check understanding
  • Really need to know your audience
  • New disease, you’re going to want to make sure that the information is at the lowest common denominator for literacy to the widest audience
  • Dangerous to assume level, need to be careful
  • The fault of the health practitioner, not explaining the whole context,
    • Health practitioner need to learn how to teach health information
    • Don’t have the skills, to talk to the patient to give them the right/correct/contextual information

5) 81.8% (9/11)of the custom-designed (by the health authority) patient education materials scored above 6th grade reading level in the Flesch-Kincaid assessment, and 100% scored above the 6th grade reading level using SMOG, it is important that literacy assessments of patient education materials are conducted. How could the library help in hospital and during the education of healthcare providers?

  • Used to sit on the committee (CEAC) for giving input on the information itself (not grade level)
  • Could work on this again now that we’ve amalgamated?
  • NS health authority does include health materials for patients

6) Patient and Family Resource Centres offer patient education materials that are usually provided to them by other publishers, either internal to the hospital or from trusted sources. Should periodic assessments of these materials be done by the librarians? How do/can we, as librarians, get others to adhere to the 6th grade level?

  • Agreement which instrument to use? Do we average them?
    • F-K is easier but is it the most accurate?
  • Committees don’t like using external, like to personalize them to SK patient in front of them
    • Are they looking at our resources at the library for patient education?
  • Some of our resources at the library are customizable
  • What grade level do we tell them to adhere to?
  • Does the MLA, ALA even have a grade reading level cut off for literacy? Health literacy?

Thoughts? Opinions? Snacks?

  • What roll do we as librarians might play with CHI resources?
  • New learning
  • One member is going to forward information to instructors for a course she’s helping with
  • Applicable to Sask, demographically
  • Yes! Maybe academic librarians can somehow embed this into the curriculum of nursing and medical students. Teach them how to identify the appropriate resources and reading level and to speak at that level with their future patients. They should be trained on that from the beginning

CARL Inclusion Perspectives Webinar Series: First Panel Featuring Black Librarians

Events

Date and Time: April 28, 3-4 pm ET (1-2 in SK)
Registration closed
View the recording here

Event Information: https://www.carl-abrc.ca/mini-site-page/carl-inclusion-perspectives-webinar-series-first-panel-featuring-black-librarians/?cn-reloaded=1

The Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL) Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Working Group is starting a series of webinars on inclusion perspectives.Their first lecture “will feature a panel of Black librarians discussing their perspectives on the state of Canadian librarianship and how we can affect change.”
This event is open to all (not just CARL institutions).

Journal Club – Global Responses of Health Science Librarians to the COVID‐19 (Corona virus) Pandemic: A Desktop Analysis

Meeting Date: November, 5, 2020

Presenter: Mary Chipanshi

Article:  Yuvaraj, M. (2020). Global responses of health science librarians to the COVID‐19 (Corona virus) pandemic: A desktop analysis. Health Information and Libraries Journal, Health information and libraries journal, 2020-07-09. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/hir.12321

Questions:

1) Are the study objectives relevant?

  • Yes, it’s relevant to know how libraries are responding to crisis to see where our services can be improved. In order to build studies around what’s working and what isn’t you have to know what people are doing first.
  • We had to think about expanding our services, finding ways to do document deliveries
  • All services were focused on COVID, requests in other areas dropped
  • Article was very relevant
  • Priorities changed to COVID, regular programming wasn’t as much of a priority
  • Collaboration among other public health libraries
  • After March everybody scrambled, it became a different normal

Does the study add anything new?

  • It helps identify launching off points for research on library services: what’s working/not working, what can be added, is this a service that can be adapted?

Was the desktop analysis approach the best method for this study?

  • For the purposes of finding out what people are doing without having to create a survey, yes.
  • This is pandemic and you’re trying to pull resources for a novel virus trying to get as much information as possible to people who need it for known clients and unknown clients
  • Trying to make things as accessible as possible
  • It would very difficult to reach professionals with a more traditional research method
  • Wish we knew more about what “desktop method means”
    • Add maybe a second level of review, have a peer review the table
  • Had to look up what desktop research was
  • Seems more like a research method for an undergraduate research paper
  • Flesh it out and tell us their research or search methods
  • Methodology section could use a lot of work, especially in clarifying what the method it used is, its purpose, etc.
  • International library associations were included (what were the criteria used?)
  • Confusion over association and website inclusion, they are very different, serve different people

Does the author acknowledge limitations in the article? If not do you see any limitations?

  • Language would be a barrier/limitation to assessing the efforts of library organizations/associations
    • Noticed that they only looked at associations that for sure have English as their main language/only language which is interesting considering where the author is from has over 20 languages
  • UK is represented, US is represented, Australia is represented
    • Where is Africa?
    • Where is India? (where author is from)
  • Library associations in Africa
    • Didn’t find anything that was COVID for them when I looked it up, they were drawing from other places
  • Author should’ve looked in more places, added limitations so that we aren’t asking these questions

Is the development of posters a good idea? Has your library developed any posters?

  • I put up the one that our organization distributed at the beginning about safety protocols (e.g. 2 meters apart, covering sneezes) but we’ve been closed since then
  • Posters are handled by communications department, library wouldn’t make the poster
  • Were told library services are going to take a backseat, but the library was still a guiding hand for searches
  • Librarian helped the communications team
  • Needs to be a central message
  • Most librarians have been home since March
  • Universal masking posters, symptom monitoring, around the library but not produced by it

How have you been providing resources to your users?

  • Mostly online, some book pickup
  • Blocked access to public computers for safety
  • At first, nobody could have access to the materials, started getting students complaining about lack of access to the library collection of textbooks
    • The text books can’t be digitized and could not provide them online
  • Started curbside pickup, within Canada but couldn’t send them out of country
  • Made book lockers available for pickup
  • Online access to books that you have in your collection, some of their books are available through the hi-T trust,
    • One problem, can’t hand out print copy when it’s in the online trust
  • Print collection was a problem, the librarians aren’t physically there to check out the books
    • Trying to find things freely available online
    • Most users want articles, not physical books
    • For ILL requests, they are faxed to the user
    • If you work in the building, user can go pick it up
  • No one is allowed to go into the stacks

Has your library developed any resources or have you linked to any COVID-19 resources for your users?

  • When COVID started, pulled together a resource page, links to resources, live search. Synopses of articles, links to publishers that are making article open access for COVID articles
  • Quicklinks to other national/provincial public health websites and other international public health sites: CDC, WHO
    • Dashboards (Johns Hopkins), vaccine tracker
    • Librarians email each other to update the page
  • Thinking of making a lib guide but we don’t have the time
  • Huge amount of collaboration and peer review for searches and search strategies

Do you think that in the process of expanding the librarian’s role in response to the COVID-19 crisis the users are lost?

  • Lost patient/family users, they couldn’t safely access our in-person resources and we don’t have a lot of online resources for the public
  • Requests were way down, thought “was it something we did?”
    • After the first wave, there was an increase in the use in preparation for the second wave
  • Not at the usual level, but maybe it’s coming back

Have libraries acquired new users?

  • Our library has definitely acquired new users, but they are people who could have used our services before so there is a question of “why weren’t they?” and “how can we make sure they continue to use our services after the pandemic ends?”
  • Gained student users, they don’t have to be physically in Canada anymore to be a student but they can still access or request access to our resources
  • Reaching out to potential users
  • Reviewing regular programs and taking care of COVID at the same time
  • Wondering if word of mouth for the library was passed around in online communications

Are there any other comments/additions that you would like to share from the article?

  • Very much like the desktop method for inexpensive research
  • Another inexpensive method, document analysis, basing your research on documents you were able to pull from the resource you use

Journal Club – The Application of Internet-Based Sources for Public Health Surveillance (Infoveillance): Systematic Review

Meeting Date: September 21, 2020

Presenter: Mark Mueller

Article: Barros JM, Duggan J, Rebholz-Schuhmann D. The Application of Internet-Based Sources for Public Health Surveillance (Infoveillance): Systematic Review. J Med Internet Res 2020;22(3):e13680 https://www.jmir.org/2020/3/e13680/

Questions:

1) What do the authors mean by infodemiology or infoveillance? What does this look like in practice?

• Science of distribution and determinents of information, particularly the internet to inform public health and public policy
• Sharing and searching information
• Scientists using it predict the spread of COVID-19 previously
• Sources used to extract data: social; discussion forums; mobile apps (i.e. COVID-19 tracker app); other sources search queries; news articles; websites; media monitoring systems; web encyclopaedias; online obituaries

2) What is the potential value in using Internet-Based-Resources to study the course of a disease or an outbreak?

• Real-time data and discern health-related concerns; and developed responses
• No infrastructure to obscure information. Less barriers. More representative of various population groups and country-specific phenomenon
• Accelerate resolutions (i.e. treatments, economic resolutions, resource sharing, etc.)
• Insights into how disease is affecting and/or being discussed
• Topic analyses
• Can be used to monitor what information is being shared and when

3) What are the potential limitations in using Internet-Based Resources to study the course of a disease or an outbreak?

• Difficulty accessing the internet (particularly in developing countries) – data may not be complete and knowledge gaps
• Potential that information could be fabricated (misinformation)
• Bots/trolls may make false information/claims
• Information could be lost in translation – semantics could be lost
• Misinformation being shared, Google trends does not provide demographic data

4) Do you think it might be possible to work this research approach into our daily workflow as librarians; particularly for those of us who might be part of a COVID-19 response effort? If so, why? If not, why not?

• Create infographics
• Can detect where the misinformation is coming from – address the misinformation at the point-of-need

5) Could this research approach be applied to other contexts and/or topics related to library work? Example: monitoring other topics within the medical/healthcare community; combating fake news; etc.

• Community trends for topics that come up in the reference queue (i.e. health concerns, new courses)?
• To address misinformation would require professionalization in medicine, ethics, etc. that go beyond our scope

Journal Club: “How do I do that?” a literature review of research data management skill gaps of Canadian health sciences information professionals

Meeting Date: January 27, 2020

Presenter: Kaetlyn Phillips

Article: Fuhr, J. (2019). “How do I do that?” a literature review of research data management skill gaps of Canadian health sciences information professionals. Journal of Canadian Health Libraries Association, 40, 51-69. 10.29173/jchla29371.

Questions:

1) Are you familiar with research data management (RDM)? Have you been asked to start or participate in RDM programs? Do you feel there is a gap in your knowledge?

  • There is absolutely a gap in my knowledge of this topic
  • Only heard the term before, didn’t know everything it pertained to, did want to know about it so the article was a good choice
  • Heard of some of some of the concepts before but wasn’t sure what they meant in context of library work
  • What role do we play, in terms of offering these services for our patrons
  • Knowledge gaps are overwhelming, once you get comfortable with the jargon the process becomes easier as does identifying missing skills
  • Not just us in the libraries, many professions have this problem

2) Do you agree with the list of skills provided in Table 1? Should skills be added? Which ones? Why?

  • Security knowledge or confidentiality and the limitations of de-identified data
  • Seems like a lot to put on a single person
  • When I looked at the skills listed in the article and thought about what it is I do, I felt overwhelmed. I think having an expert is better than pushing it on librarians without training
  • It’s a lot of put on librarian’s without training, needs to be a collaborative process, consulting with a librarian who is a RDM librarian
  • The list of skills looked like a job description, you would need someone to do this full time not just tacked onto existing responsibilities of the existing librarians. Academic institutions are creating Research Data Management positions, so the future of RDM in health sciences could be collaborative as opposed to one librarian doing many roles

3) In your opinion, what role will RDM play into Healthcare’s Evidence based practice?

  • Better organized and available data can make for better studies because more participants’ information can be included for analysis, IF the data uses the same metadata or architecture or even standardized terminology
  • Making metadata available is a definite weakness, making a user’s guide is super helpful so you can understand what you’re looking at
  • Only a couple of people have heard of the data centers in Saskatchewan which are targeting health researchers (e.g. for rare diseases)

4) The article has many suggestions for implementing RDA training. What kind of training would work best for health sciences librarians?

  • Asynchronous but organized, lower stakes less stress, not overwhelming people with all of the possible information
  • Ties back to context, it would depend on the librarian’s skill set, we shouldn’t play down the knowledge and skill set we bring as librarian’s
  • Peer-to-peer but also, given the skill sets mentioned in the article we might already have similar skills that can be applied
  • Quite a few classes in MLIS are only offered once a year so you often miss out if you only want to do your MLIS within the usual timeline (one year)
  • We could advocate of continuing education in our associations
  • There’s a lot of courses on data management and analysis that are for using the data and not for organizing it after the fact or while gathering it
  • There’s lots out there but finding it, finding good quality and getting credit for it is difficult
  • RDM courses that are self-paced and open are needed. Even if iSchools and MLIS programs include courses on RDM, it’s possible that those courses won’t be enough to fill the knowledge gap. Peer to peer professional development would also be beneficial.

5) The author “foresees a trickle-down effect of research data services in health sciences and specialized libraries, regardless of affiliation with a post-secondary institution” (Fuhr, 2019, p.57). Based on your experience and knowledge, do you agree or disagree with the statement?

  • Only if we speak up, scientists have a tendency to silo their data because of how research and promotion is rewarded (the originality of the research and the groundbreaking is rewarded over reproducibility; despite reproducibility being the backbone of science)
  • We’d have to take initiative to get them involved with us
  • We have a relationship with our research department, but it’s a bit of a black box, there’s other services we focus on so it’s also a capacity issue for us even just getting people on board
  • It’s not on our radar
  • Will the grant application process, the necessity of having an RDM process in your application, will that change the playfield?
  • Research has never been the main driver of hospitals
  • The concept of a trickle-down effect seems implausible, or would take a long time to occur.  Within health science organizations, research is often a separate branch outside of the library, so libraries would need to promote the service over being “forced” into it. Within academic health science institutions, RDM is falling under the library’s roles and duties, so consulting with a librarian could be encouraged.

Any other questions? Comments?

Journal Club: What does a librarian do on sabbatical?: researching the IL needs of international students at the University of Zambia (UNZA)

Meeting Date: Nov 29 2019 | 2:00pm – 3:00pm UTC

Presenter: Mary Chipanshi

Background: International students contribute a significant boost to the economy of every university.  It is well documented that students coming to a new university find themselves dealing with different challenges.  The literature has identifies that one of the challenges faced by these students in a new university is navigating the library. It is therefore imperative that academic libraries find strategies to assist these students adjust to their new environment.  In order to accomplish this effectively, librarians and libraries needs to know the student’s prior library experience. This study was conducted at the University of Zambia, using focus groups. A total of 22 students participated in the focus groups.  Students were asked questions related to their experience using UNZA library with regard to searching for information for assignments, using information ethically and evaluating the information. Preliminary results indicate that most of the students use the internet to find resources for their assignments and prefer to consult colleagues instead of a librarian. The library is also viewed more as a reading space than a place they can get resources.  They also understood the importance of crediting resources and plagiarism. The results of this project is of benefit to all those working with international students.

Questions:

1. With the librarian program in UNZA is it an undergrad? What’s the training for the students?

It’s ALA accredited program for undergrad, with that degree you can go do your masters. You have to go out of country to do a masters.

2. Do you have to have the master to be a librarian in the university?

You can work in the library as a librarian (because you have a BA in Library Studies) but to get a promotion you need to have a masters.

3. Would you like to go back and do more research?

Having to self-fund the project meant that it was quite costly, so unfortunately probably not. She would try to get funding if she did it again.

4. Do you how much outreach HINARI does? How often?

They go all over the world to train and they go quite often. They’ve been to Zambia 3 times. Their method is to train one librarian at an institution so that librarian can go and teach the other librarians to train students and faculty. Unfortunately, many librarians don’t have the time, so the faculty members and student don’t know about the services offered by HINARI. Users need id and password to access, which the librarians would need to pass onto to the faculty and students.

5. Is there a website for the library?

The librarians wanted to learn about libguides to push out these tools because the current website is the instituional website.

6. Would you want to do a follow-up study on the library changes after your workshops with the faculty?

Maybe, probably to see what happened with the libguides and kahooit

Thoughts

It’s neat that you can do the undergrad at UNZA

Important to understand how international students understand and use information

Could do a follow-up study here (UofR) on other international students

Journal Club: Critical librarianship in health sciences libraries: An introduction

Meeting Date: July 24, 2019

Presenter: Michelle Dalidowicz

Citation: Barr-Walker J, Sharifi C. Critical librarianship in health sciences libraries: an introduction. Journal of the Medical Library Association : JMLA. 2019;107(2):258-64. DOI: 10.5195/jmla.2019.620
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6466494/

Article Abstract:

The Medical Library Association recently announced its commitment to diversity and inclusion. While this is a positive start, critical librarianship takes the crucial concepts of diversity and inclusion one step further by advocating for social justice action and the dismantling of oppressive institutional structures, including white supremacy, patriarchy, and capitalism. Critical librarianship takes many forms, but, at its root, is focused on interrogating and disrupting inequitable systems, including changing racist cataloging rules, creating student-driven information literacy instruction, supporting inclusive and ethical publishing models, and rejecting the notion of libraries as neutral spaces. This article presents examples of the application of critical practice in libraries as well as ideas for applying critical librarianship to the health sciences.

Critical Appraisal:

Questions:

1) Critical Librarianship is usually defined as applying the principles of social justice to our work as librarians. Is there anything that you would add to that definition?

– critical theory is really the basis

– more than just saying ‘social justice’ has to state actual ‘anti-‘ statements

– but when do you stop naming anti- stances

– are there certain ones that are more insidious, that just can’t be not stated

– power differentials, important piece of these discussions

2) In undergrad or in post grad, did you ever receive instruction on critical studies? Do you feel comfortable engaging with it as part of your work?

– English undergrad covered critical theory, inclusion and anti-inclusion; it comes up a lot

– sociology covers it; milder conversations but the same stuff

– race relations in Canada were covered in a gender studies course

– Not as much convo in the gender studies on critical theory

– nothing in MLIS; hope that changes

– MLIS talked about homelessness

– MLIS only exposure was in cataloguing, used examples that showed how things weren’t reflective of anti-oppressive critical librarianship; but it wasn’t presented as critical librarianship

– history, topics came up as we talked about American history and immigration but it wasn’t critical theory

– pop music course brought in critical theory

– want to say “yes” am comfortable engaging, being outspoken about social justice

– barriers include politeness, people might not say anything but they will be silently judging you for speaking out about it [critical theory/social justice]

– it’s more insidious [oppressive systems], unless you’re an oppressed group or have studied critical theory/social justice theories you’re unlikely to recognize the problems with the systems that are in place.

– Needs more critical mass from society, people don’t know how to respond and they don’t ‘see’ the offense

– in terms of our practice, I use examples of contentious terms and how much the ‘outdated’ words are used versus more appropriate terms.

– it’s becoming easier to talk about privilege; but not everyone understands it

– the fights and the backlash might cause people to refrain from getting involved out of fear or wanting to avoid discomfort

3) What would critical medical librarianship look like and what might it encompass (e.g. social justice, health disparities)?

– health disparities is one we get often asked about

– it becomes apparent in the searching you do, indigenous, rural ect. We as librarians get an idea of ‘where the money goes’, the lack of research when oppressed population is combined with ‘x’ health condition

– more patient advocate role; the librarian as a patient advocate (paper from the states)

– how do we engage with patients? Consumer guides, who’s looking at what we’re making?

4) Do you feel like you are already using critical librarianship in your health library practice?

– not enough

– article was a good reminder of what we can control: what we find, reference interview questions, instruction that touches on access (the privilege of being able to access paywall journals, the services we provide),

– selection of articles, how can we build that into library instruction, throwing in a critical article

– often patrons are looking for ‘support’ for their question, but what if the opposite is better care? Do you want all the evidence or only what supports your opinion?

– is publication bias a social justice issue? Possibly, it’s definitely a bias

– articles that we don’t include because we don’t ‘trust’ the source or the population is ‘not the same’

5) Different areas of library work and how they can be affected by critical librarianship were touched upon in the article. Were there areas which you felt could be more readily changed in your library practice than others and how would you like to be able to do so?

– cultural heritage, would be interesting to curate articles and materials for indigenous health or educational materials of indigenous methods of healing

– the search results, what we’re picking out, what we’re supporting; more inclusive questions in the reference interview

– involving patients in their care

5a) Were there areas of library work you think were missing that could be found in critical health librarianship?

6) Are there ways that we, as health librarians, make choices in our work that go against critical librarianship ideals?

7) What are ways that we can use critical librarianship in our health libraries right now to encourage social justice critical thinking and engagement in our patrons?

– using search examples in teaching; using social justice topics in our library search instruction to keep it in the fore front

(Note: We ran out of time so we skipped questions 5a and 6)

Chapter Update: 2018 Spring AGM

The 2018 Spring SHLA meeting opened with two member presentations and roundtable updates from members.

Susan Baer, Director of Libraries and Archives at Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region, presented on the history and research developments of a working group of pan-Canadian librarians investigating the development of standards for literature searching. The group used an online questionnaire to identify steps searchers would take to conduct an ‘exemplary search,’ and developed a living-document glossary to address the issue of inconsistencies in search term use. Over time, the project developed from a standard into a code of practice to inform mediated searching practices.

Saskatchewan Polytechnic librarians Tasha Maddison and Diane Zerr discussed a new online module created for the institute’s Adult Teaching and Learning Program. This program develops and advances the leadership and instructional skills of faculty. The Library has previously provided in-person research, citation, and technology education sessions to support learners. The shift to online, self-paced instruction has provided the Library with the opportunity to collaborate with Learning Technology trainers and Adult Teaching and Learning instructors. Diane and Tasha showcased the librarian’s role in blended curriculum design by integrating learning outcomes, learning steps, and assessments into the modules.

Roundtable updates were given on member activities at the Saskatchewan Health Authority, Saskatchewan Polytechnic, University of Regina, and University of Saskatchewan (see minutes for details).

To kick off the AGM, Lance provided an update on the SHLA Journal Club, which currently has 14 members and is now listed on the Library Journal Club Network. Gina demonstrated options for uniting content from the JC and SHLA WordPress sites. The motion to combine the Journal Club website content with the SHLA website, and to make this content public, was passed.

Updates from the executive members included an overview of executive activities over the year, which focused on administrative and business continuity. The Constitutional Review Working Group Report was discussed, and accepted with amendments. No nominees were volunteered for Secretary-Treasurer and President-Elect. Alongside another call for these vacant positions, nominations for the new Continuing Education Coordinator position will be sent out to the membership.

Motions to spent surplus SHLA funds by supporting the current President in her attendance of the 2018 CHLA/ABSC Conference, and to create bursaries to send the 2019 Executive to the CHLA/ABSC conference (based on operating budget), were carried. A motion to establish an operating budget was also put forward and carried.

Michelle requested that the membership review the CHLA/ABSC Strategic Plan to provide ideas and suggestions to inform future directions of the SHLA.

Journal Club: Research engagement of health sciences librarians

Meeting date: Tuesday, May 29, 2018

Presenter: Catherine Hana

Citation: Dawson, D. (DeDe) ., (2018). Effective Practices and Strategies for Open Access Outreach: A Qualitative Study. Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication. 6(1), p.eP2216. DOI: http://doi.org/10.7710/2162-3309.2216

Article abstract:
INTRODUCTION – There are many compelling reasons to make research open access (OA), but raising the awareness of faculty and administrators about OA is a struggle. Now that more and more funders are introducing OA policies, it is increasingly important that researchers understand OA and how to comply with these policies. U.K. researchers and their institutions have operated within a complex OA policy environment for many years, and academic libraries have been at the forefront of providing services and outreach to support them. This article discusses the results of a qualitative study that investigated effective practices and strategies of OA outreach in the United Kingdom.

METHODS – Semistructured interviews were conducted with 14 individuals at seven universities in the United Kingdom in late 2015. Transcripts of these interviews were analyzed for dominant themes using an inductive method of coding.

RESULTS – Themes were collected under the major headings of “The Message”; “Key Contacts and Relationships”; “Qualities of the OA Practitioner”; and “Advocacy versus Compliance.” DISCUSSION Results indicate that messages about OA need to be clear, concise, and jargon free. They need to be delivered repeatedly and creatively adapted to specific audiences. Identifying and building relationships with influencers and informers is key to the uptake of the message, and OA practitioners must have deep expertise to be credible as the messengers.

CONCLUSION – This timely research has immediate relevance to North American libraries as they contend with pressures to ramp up their own OA outreach and support services to assist researchers in complying with new federal funding policies.

Reason for selection: DeDe presented at the joint SHLA/MAHIP CE session on May 10. As several journal club members also attended the session, I thought it would be good to take a more in-depth look at DeDe’s findings. For those who were not at the CE session, this is still an interesting and relevant topic that has not been well covered in previous journal club meetings.

Critical Appraisal:
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